Jeremy’s Head

Mon Mar 29, 2010 at 8:39 am in Crochet, Family, Finished Projects | No Comments

Isn’t this excellent?

Jeremy's Beanie

He’s described it as his “mid-winter” hat. I told you it was warm.

Jeremy's Beanie

He looks very mountain man-ish. :D

By the way, when I didn’t like my color changes on Draft 1, I went to the Interwebs, and came up with a list of articles how to crochet color changes the right way. I’ll update my other post with the chart with these.

How to Crochet Using a Chart or Graph (includes color change)

Tapestry Crochet – right or left hand color changing. From Carol Ventura, who’s written tapestry crochet books.

Color Changing from About.com

How to Switch Colors and Use a Chart – Crochet by April Draven

An interesting yarn-joining/color-changing technique. Russian? Maybe.

A Hat Inspired by the Mountains it will be Used On

Wed Mar 24, 2010 at 12:47 am in Crochet, Family, Finished Projects | 7 Comments

Last Christmas in Iowa I offered to make my brother a crocheted hat. A beanie, specifically, because that’s what snowboarders wear.

Snowboarders can be pretty serious about their beanies.

Mountain Beanie

{Jeff wearing the hat. Jeremy has a bigger head than either of us. When I wear it, it comes down over my eyes.}

Jeremy took me up on the beanie offer and made his specifications: red on top, then blue, then charcoal. He picked out the yarn himself at Jo-Ann’s: Lion Brand Wool-Ease Chunky in Charcoal and Medium Blue and Deborah Norville Serenity Chunky in red ochre. I’m amazed I know what the red one is, because Wesley LOVED it and tried to eat it at every opportunity. Wesley did away with the label a long time ago.

Colors

Jeremy requested that the hat depict his very favorite thing, mountains. That it match his snowboarding gear (blue and red). That it have a puffy yarn puffy thing on top made of all three colors. That it have a fleece ear lining for comfort.

Thus it was that this rather epically warm hat was made.

Details

The color changes are made by carrying both yarns along as you crochet (i.e. tapestry crochet). I carried 2 strands of red or blue or gray the entire way, even if I wasn’t changing colors within a row, because I wanted the whole thing to be the same thickness.

I used a size L hook to do this. Even so, the hook was almost too small for 2 pieces of chunky yarn. It’s a thick hat. Sturdy. Squishy. I dare say this hat will take Jeremy comfortably through negative temps with no problems.

Side View

This was my third try making it. Totally my own pattern. I think I got it right this time. Can you see the ribbing on the bottom? It’s hard to see. It’s crochet-in-the-back post faux ribbing, i.e. 2 stitches regular, 2 stitches back post, repeat around.

The pattern (it’s a graph) is uploaded in case anyone would like to try, and is located here:  Mountain Beanie – Excel or Mountain Beanie – PDF. It doesn’t have much explanation, just shows how many stitches in each repeat and the colors, and the number of stitches around for each of the 28 rows. My notes on carrying yarn and the ribbing are in the post. If anyone has problems with it, let me know!

Now to mail it to Jeremy.

Update: Added links to explanations of color changes for crochet, below.

By the way, when I didn’t like my color changes on Draft 1, I went to the Interwebs, and came up with a list of articles how to crochet color changes the right way. I’ll update my other post with the chart with these.

How to Crochet Using a Chart or Graph (includes color change)

Tapestry Crochet – right or left hand color changing. From Carol Ventura, who’s written tapestry crochet books.

Color Changing from About.com

How to Switch Colors and Use a Chart – Crochet by April Draven

An interesting yarn-joining/color-changing technique. Russian? Maybe.

An Awareness of Time Passing

Tue Feb 2, 2010 at 8:44 am in Crochet, WIP | 1 Comment

At the beginning of this month (aww crap it’s already next month, nevermind) January I wrote out a sort of plan for production of creative things for the year. And already, I’m behind. I thought of time passing, about how I now have just 11 months to feel accomplished about my year!

And then I said no. I am not going to beat myself up about this. I know this happens. It is not a real problem and I am not actually upset. I think, in fact, that I’ve soldiered quite bravely on in the face of some disappointing problems that require fortitude to correct. You see, sometimes when I encounter a problem, I solve it by just getting rid of the problem. You have to admit, it is a type of solution. However, when the problem in question is something you’ve spent hours or days working on, it’s not so easy to just get rid of it. Actually, I think it would feel physically painful to try to throw something away like a sweater I crocheted.

The red sweater is a good example of this. After my last post, I sewed up the sides.  As I suspected, the sweater does not fit – the arms are too small and it requires decreases in the yoke. I am going to have to rip out the entire yoke, detach the sleeves and start on this part again. I do not want to. It makes me want to throw a two-year-old’s tantrum. But I will finish. Later. When I’m not so irritated that just looking at the problem makes me feel a little, ok a lot stabby. It’s a long version of that “count to 10″ recommendation for people with tempers.

Then there is the case of Jeremy’s Mountain Hat.

First, I made a mountain crochet chart. The chart is awesome. Then I made a beanie crown. The crown was … meh. Then I started making the rest of the hat, and encountered HAT FAIL. (1) I didn’t like my color changes, and (2) somehow I lost 10 stitches around. That’s right. I went from 72 stitches around to 62. The yarn that I’m working with is bulky, and when you carry yarn, sometimes the stitch the color changes on ceases to look like a stitch, so I ended up accidentally skipping it in the next row. I thought I was losing my mind.

PLUS -(3) the crown color yarn is slightly less bulky than the other two yarns, and I’m using tapestry crochet (where you carry 2 strands of yarn) for the pattern part. Ergo – there’s a significant fabric difference between the Not-as-thick-single-strand-crochet of the crown and Thicker-two-strand-crochet of the pattern. It was not attractive.

So I frogged the whole thing.

I going to start over. And when I’m done, it will be a thing of joy and beauty.

Just you wait.